Monday, April 15, 2013

Linux, on Hyper-V Server 2012

 

Supported Linux on Hyper-V 2012,  ALL Are 64 BIT ! (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831531.aspx)

CentOS 5.7 and 5.8, CentOS 6.0 – 6.3 (Download and install Linux Integration Services Version 3.4 for Hyper-V.)

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.7 and 5.8, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.0 – 6.3 (Download and install Linux Integration Services Version 3.4 for Hyper-V.)

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP2 (Integration services do not require a separate installation because they are built-in.

Open SUSE 12.1 (Integration services are built-in.)

Ubuntu 12.04 (Integration services are built-in.)

 

Dont forget there are Integration Services AND an SCVMM Agent

(http://windowsitpro.com/virtual-machine-manager/deploy-linux-scvmm )

Checking the OS (Red Hat)

Checking Redhat version installed

$ uname -a

Linux server.domain.com 2.4.22-32.ELsmp #1 SMP Mon Apr 15 21:17:59 EDT 2005 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux

To get the version in simple terms, check  /etc/redhat-release instead.

$ cat /etc/redhat-release

Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS release 3 (Taroon Update 5)

image

To turn on DHCP for Red Hat

To configure a DHCP client manually, modify  the /etc/sysconfig/network file to enable networking and the configuration file for each network device in the /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts directory. In this directory, each device should have a configuration file named ifcfg-eth0, where eth0 is the network device name.

The /etc/sysconfig/network file should contain the following line:

NETWORKING=yes


The NETWORKING variable must be set to yes if you want networking to start at boot time.



The /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 file should contain the following lines:



DEVICE=eth0
BOOTPROTO=dhcp
ONBOOT=yes


Other options for the network script include:





  • DHCP_HOSTNAME — Only use this option if the DHCP server requires the client to specify a hostname before receiving an IP address. (The DHCP server daemon in Red Hat Enterprise Linux does not support this feature.)





  • PEERDNS=<answer>, where <answer> is one of the following:





    • yes — Modify /etc/resolv.conf with information from the server. If using DHCP, then yes is the default.





    • no — Do not modify /etc/resolv.conf.







  • SRCADDR=<address>, where <address> is the specified source IP address for outgoing packets.





  • USERCTL=<answer>, where <answer> is one of the following:





    • yes — Non-root users are allowed to control this device.





    • no — Non-root users are not allowed to control this device.







https://access.redhat.com/site/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/3/html/System_Administration_Guide/s1-dhcp-configuring-client.html

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